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Rubiks Cube & Twisty

Twisty and rotational puzzles are not just cube puzzles these days! The Rubik's Cube puzzle is still the most well known twisty puzzle ever but we've got lots more rotational puzzles too. Twisty Puzzles is a fun name given to a type of puzzle that require the solver to rotate or twist pieces to create the final solved puzzle. Here you will find 2x2, 3x3, 4x4 and 5x5 cubes, even 7x7! Also joined cubes, other shapes and sequential puzzles using twisty or rotating moves and more. 

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Items 1 to 9 of 35 total

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  4. 4

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The Rubik's Cube is so well known, so famous, such an icon, that anything in the Twisty Puzzle category is often referred to as a Rubik's Cube. In fact many people use the Rubik's Cube to describe any brainteaser or mechanical puzzle to ensure others know what they're talking about. But not every Twisty Puzzle is a Rubik's Cube!

A Twisty Puzzle is a type of sequential move puzzle getting its name because usually to solve the puzzle you need to rearrange the shape by rotating or twisting the puzzle.
In its general form the puzzle pieces have a series of colours and the solved state is when each face of the puzzle has a single colour.  Just like the six colours of the original Rubik's Cube.  But puzzle designers have move way past a standard set of colours to include other patterns, animals, letter and number sets and much more.  They have also advanced way beyond the cube to many different and interesting shapes like those you'll see on this page.

While it can be said that all Twisty or Rotational puzzles are descended from the Rubik's Cube there are now countless variations, amazing new mechanism's that Enro Rubik probably never envisaged, and lots and lots of different shapes, many of which morph into even stranger shapes when turned!

This history of the Rubik's Cube's invention is a great story in itself.

Enro Rubik from Hungary wanted to create an object that seemed to defy the laws of possibility; he wanted a structure which, whilst staying held together, had movable independent parts that could be manipulated and have their positions changed. He wasn't inventing a puzzle. He was looking for a model to help explain three-dimensional objects to his students at the Academy of Applied Arts and Crafts in Budapest. So, the first types of cubes he created were simple wooden blocks that were held together with rubber bands and paperclips.

In fact, another man by the name of Larry Nichols had already invented a 2x2 puzzle which had a much simpler design; magnets were used instead of rubber bands and paperclips. This meant that the puzzle could be separated into its 8 blocks quite easily, making it fairly unstable. The patent for this original 2x2 cube was filed in 1972, two years before Rubik invented his own 3x3.

The progression from 2x2 to 3x3 cube may not seem like that much of an advance but the 2x2 didn’t need a central core to control the movements of the separate pieces. To make the 3x3 cube Enro Rubik took another two years and a 3x3 Rubik's Cube prototype was finalised in 1974. This then led to patents and after signing with toy company Ideal it was sold in Hungary and then eventually became a worldwide sensation in 1980 and is still recognised today as an icon of the 1980's.

The Rubik's Cube is so well known, so famous, such an icon, that anything in the Twisty Puzzle category is often referred to as a Rubik's Cube. In fact many people use the Rubik's Cube to describe any brainteaser or mechanical puzzle to ensure others know what they're talking about. But not every Twisty Puzzle is a Rubik's Cube!

A Twisty Puzzle is a type of sequential move puzzle getting its name because usually to solve the puzzle you need to rearrange the shape by rotating or twisting the puzzle.

The basic Rubiks Cube or Magic Cube or similar has a series of colours and it is solved when each face of the cube is returned to a single colour. Just like the six colours of the original Rubik's Cube.  But puzzle designers have move way past a basic set of colours and puzzles can now be seen with other patterns, animals, letters and numbers, sudoku sets and much more. They have also advanced way beyond the cube to many different and interesting shapes like those you'll see on this page.

While it can be said that all Twisty or Rotational puzzles are descended from the Rubik's Cube there are now countless variations, amazing new mechanism's that Enro Rubik probably never envisaged, and lots and lots of different shapes, many of which morph into even stranger shapes when turned!

This history of the Rubik's Cube's invention is a great story in itself.

Rubik Erno from Hungary wanted to create an object that seemed to defy the laws of possibility; he wanted a structure which, whilst staying held together, had movable independent parts that could be manipulated and have their positions changed. He wasn't inventing a puzzle. He was looking for a model to help explain three-dimensional objects to his students at the Academy of Applied Arts and Crafts in Budapest. So, the first types of cubes he created were simple wooden blocks that were held together with rubber bands and paperclips.

In fact, another man by the name of Larry Nichols had already invented a 2x2 puzzle which had a much simpler design; magnets were used instead of rubber bands and paperclips. This meant that the puzzle could be separated into its 8 blocks quite easily, making it fairly unstable. The patent for this original 2x2 cube was filed in 1972, two years before Rubik invented his own 3x3.

The progression from 2x2 to 3x3 cube may not seem like that much of an advance but the 2x2 didn’t need a central core to control the movements of the separate pieces. To make the 3x3 cube Enro Rubik took another two years and a 3x3 Rubik's Cube prototype was finalised in 1974. This then led to patents and after signing with toy company Ideal it was sold in Hungary and then eventually became a worldwide sensation in 1980 and is still recognised today as an icon of the 1980's.

The largest officially recgonsied Rubik's Cube is 1.57meter. The Guinness Book of Records added it in April 2016 as the Biggest Rubik's Cube in the World and still not beaten.  See Tony Fisher solving his working cube in his backyard in Suffolk in England.  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rsk8LSdUTUo

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